Non Fiction


21
Mar 10

Other People’s Daughters: The Life And Times Of The Governess

Other People's Daughters

Other People’s Daughters: The Life And Times Of The Governess
Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson; illustrated edition edition (13 Mar 2008)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0297851136
ISBN-13: 978-0297851134

The Governess
Governess: The Lives and Times of the Real Jane Eyres
Hardcover: 320 pages
Publisher: Walker & Company (29 April 2008)
Language English
ISBN-10: 080271630X
ISBN-13: 978-0802716309

If a nineteenth century lady had neither a husband to support her nor money of her own, almost her only recourse was to live in someone else’s household and educate their children – in particular, their daughters.

Marooned within the confines of other people’s lives, neither servants nor family members, governesses occupied an uncomfortable social limbo.  And being poor and insignificant, their papers were mostly lost, so that most of what we know about this strange and unsatisfactory life comes either from novels, like Jane Eyre or Vanity Fair, or from fleeting glimpses in other people’s memoirs.  But a few journals and letters have come down to us, giving a vivid record of what it was to be a lone professional woman at a time when such a creature officially did not exist.

Other People’s Daughters looks at these lives, some famous, like the Brontës, or Anna Leonowens, whose memoirs inspired The King and I,  some quite unknown, their papers surfacing by the merest chance.

Beginning with Mary Wollstonecraft’s realization, in the heady days following the French revolution, that only equal education could ensure true equality for women, the book shows how the governess, who could be relied on to teach only the little she had herself been permitted to learn, was an essential part of that dream’s collapse.  It ends with the foundation of Girton College, Cambridge, the first women’s university college:  the beginning of the end for the governess, and the first step on the road to realizing Wollstonecraft’s dream.

This is a rich and fascinating account of lives whose suppressed fury, romantic daydreams and intellectual frustration provide a unique prism through which Ruth examines Victorian attitudes to women, family and class.


21
Mar 10

People’s Chef: Alexis Soyer, a Life in Seven Courses

The People's Chef

People’s Chef: Alexis Soyer, a Life in Seven Courses
Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons (23 April 2004)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0470869917
ISBN-13: 978-0470869918

Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons (25 Feb 2005)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0470869925
ISBN-13: 978-0470869925

During the first half of the nineteenth century, Alexis Soyer, a Frenchman from Meaux, was the most famous cook – and one of the most famous men – in London. But that is not the reason – or not the only reason – why he is interesting. A combination of chance, talent and energetic social conscience took him into many of the great events of his times. Born in 1810, he cooked his way through the Paris July Days in 1830; fled to England, where he was cook in a great country house during the Captain Swing riots in 1832; oversaw the building of London’s most modern kitchen at the Reform Club, where he was head chef from 1837-1850; designed a model soup-kitchen which he took to Ireland, at the Lord Lieutenant’s request, during the 1847 famine; opened London’s first Parisian-type restaurant in conjunction with the Great Exhibition in 1851, having turned down the official catering contract; and in 1855, horrified by W.H.Russell’s reports in The Times, went to the Crimea to take over the running of the kitchens in Florence Nightingale’s hospital at Scutari – having first designed a new army cook-stove, economical, portable, and practical indoors or out, a design that remained in use until very recently. When he died in 1858, he was helping Miss Nightingale reform British army catering.

Here is the first half of the nineteenth century seen from the culinary point of view. The book is arranged, as the title implies, as a dinner-party, the different courses (I cooked them all) each taken from one or other of Soyer’s various recipe books. Each course is correct for its place in the dinner, but is also chosen for its relevance to the subjects discussed in the chapter in question. What were the differences between French and English food at this time, and what caused them? Why did the French favour restaurants, while the English preferred clubs? What did the very poor eat, and why did the Irish ignore the fish that teemed all around them? What was the position of a chef in society – was he an artist, which was how Soyer saw himself, or just a servant? (Interestingly, his personal life was conducted in artistic milieux that reflected his classless and cosmopolitan outlook. He married a painter, and after her death conducted a long affair with the ballerina Fanny Cerrito.) Why did Soyer so energetically take up the cause of the poor? Was it because he himself had been born poor and knew what it was like? Or because he was a Protestant and Protestants in France at that time were radicals and outsiders? Why was he able to get along so well in Turkey (as he did)? What did the men eat in the Crimea? Why was the French army there so much better organised than the English?

The People’s Chef, part cookbook, part biography and part history, is an unusual mix with a charming and highly original hero. Perhaps not coincidentally, this is the third time I have been attracted to a subject who made his mark despite being at best semi-literate (the other two were Singer, the sewing-machine magnate, and Houdini). People like this are of course unusually driven, and I’m interested in what drives them; but they also require a rather original approach to biography. Since there are no diaries or correspondence, these lives must be traced almost wholly through their acts; and these acts (in Houdini’s case magic tricks, in Soyer’s, the creation of meals) thus acquire a symbolic significance. Houdini’s tricks lead to a consideration of what constitutes real magic; and Soyer’s dishes take us behind the scenes of great historical events, deep into the life of his times.

As the title suggests, The People’s Chef is arranged as a dinner party in seven courses, introduced by a Menu.